Beat the heat. Art by Rudy Palais.

How Congress operates. Art by Howard Nostrand.

jeanscomics:

Night Burgers #1, now available for pre-order!

24 pages of full color neon comics by Victor Kerlow (thankyouvictor), Josh Burggraf  (joshburggraf), Josh Freydkis (joshfreydkis), Jason Murphy (menutnutnut), Anthony Meloro (anthonymeloro), Ken Johnson ballandcone and Amy Searles amyofdarkness.  Edited/cover by Harris Smith negativepleasure

Each copy includes prismatic viewing glasses for full psychedelic reading experience.

Preorder now: http://negativepleasure.storenvy.com/products/6105226-night-burgers-1

!!!!!!!!!!!!!

samriedel:

anthonymeloro:

No Time
The above examples show some of the basic differences between Bronze Age and contemporary (mainstream) comic “reading”.  The most obvious characteristic is contemporary comic’s lack of text.  Now before you get all sweaty and belch out something incoherent - yes, I realize this is a singular comparison.  That stated, however, I tend to notice how I’m blazing through recent titles due to the primary focus on action (violence) and less on exposition.  Is one better than the other?  Not the point.  I view this more as a shift to how we consume information: fast and, at times, without complete context.
Ben Marra nicely sums up comic’s current stand on compositions/pacing in relation to refrained use of thought balloons:
A lot of mainstream books don’t use Thought Balloons because they want comic books to be more like movies, where thought balloons can’t exist. They want comic books to be pitches for movie content. Who can blame them when these movies make billions of dollars? The movie executives they’re pitching to don’t like thought balloons I guess. (It’s also the reason why you see a lot of mainstream comics using “widescreen” panels. This makes it easier for movie executives to envision the comic book panels as storyboard or compositions on a screen).
Lastly, Shalvey does a stellar job creating a Morris Day inspired villian.
Please click on pix for artist credits.


It’s important to note that the bottom pages are written by Warren Ellis, whose run on Stormwatch and The Authority (especially the latter) popularized the “widescreen” format. After Mark Millar continued the practice in his Authority run and later in The Ultimates, it became industry standard. And of course, without Ultimates, we wouldn’t have the MCU.

No it’s not important to note. Because I already did in my first post - read it again. But I will point out that your contribution adds nothing. samriedel:

anthonymeloro:

No Time
The above examples show some of the basic differences between Bronze Age and contemporary (mainstream) comic “reading”.  The most obvious characteristic is contemporary comic’s lack of text.  Now before you get all sweaty and belch out something incoherent - yes, I realize this is a singular comparison.  That stated, however, I tend to notice how I’m blazing through recent titles due to the primary focus on action (violence) and less on exposition.  Is one better than the other?  Not the point.  I view this more as a shift to how we consume information: fast and, at times, without complete context.
Ben Marra nicely sums up comic’s current stand on compositions/pacing in relation to refrained use of thought balloons:
A lot of mainstream books don’t use Thought Balloons because they want comic books to be more like movies, where thought balloons can’t exist. They want comic books to be pitches for movie content. Who can blame them when these movies make billions of dollars? The movie executives they’re pitching to don’t like thought balloons I guess. (It’s also the reason why you see a lot of mainstream comics using “widescreen” panels. This makes it easier for movie executives to envision the comic book panels as storyboard or compositions on a screen).
Lastly, Shalvey does a stellar job creating a Morris Day inspired villian.
Please click on pix for artist credits.


It’s important to note that the bottom pages are written by Warren Ellis, whose run on Stormwatch and The Authority (especially the latter) popularized the “widescreen” format. After Mark Millar continued the practice in his Authority run and later in The Ultimates, it became industry standard. And of course, without Ultimates, we wouldn’t have the MCU.

No it’s not important to note. Because I already did in my first post - read it again. But I will point out that your contribution adds nothing.

samriedel:

anthonymeloro:

No Time

The above examples show some of the basic differences between Bronze Age and contemporary (mainstream) comic “reading”.  The most obvious characteristic is contemporary comic’s lack of text.  Now before you get all sweaty and belch out something incoherent - yes, I realize this is a singular comparison.  That stated, however, I tend to notice how I’m blazing through recent titles due to the primary focus on action (violence) and less on exposition.  Is one better than the other?  Not the point.  I view this more as a shift to how we consume information: fast and, at times, without complete context.

Ben Marra nicely sums up comic’s current stand on compositions/pacing in relation to refrained use of thought balloons:

A lot of mainstream books don’t use Thought Balloons because they want comic books to be more like movies, where thought balloons can’t exist. They want comic books to be pitches for movie content. Who can blame them when these movies make billions of dollars? The movie executives they’re pitching to don’t like thought balloons I guess. (It’s also the reason why you see a lot of mainstream comics using “widescreen” panels. This makes it easier for movie executives to envision the comic book panels as storyboard or compositions on a screen).

Lastly, Shalvey does a stellar job creating a Morris Day inspired villian.

Please click on pix for artist credits.

It’s important to note that the bottom pages are written by Warren Ellis, whose run on Stormwatch and The Authority (especially the latter) popularized the “widescreen” format. After Mark Millar continued the practice in his Authority run and later in The Ultimates, it became industry standard. And of course, without Ultimates, we wouldn’t have the MCU.

No it’s not important to note. Because I already did in my first post - read it again. But I will point out that your contribution adds nothing.

agelfeygelach:

dr-archeville:

agelfeygelach:

anthonymeloro:

No Time
The above examples show some of the basic differences between Bronze Age and contemporary (mainstream) comic “reading”.  The most obvious characteristic is contemporary comic’s lack of text.  Now before you get all sweaty and belch out something incoherent - yes, I realize this is a singular comparison.  That stated, however, I tend to notice how I’m blazing through recent titles due to the primary focus on action (violence) and less on exposition.  Is one better than the other?  Not the point.  I view this more as a shift to how we consume information: fast and, at times, without complete context.
Ben Marra nicely sums up comic’s current stand on compositions/pacing in relation to refrained use of thought balloons:
A lot of mainstream books don’t use Thought Balloons because they want comic books to be more like movies, where thought balloons can’t exist. They want comic books to be pitches for movie content. Who can blame them when these movies make billions of dollars? The movie executives they’re pitching to don’t like thought balloons I guess. (It’s also the reason why you see a lot of mainstream comics using “widescreen” panels. This makes it easier for movie executives to envision the comic book panels as storyboard or compositions on a screen).
Lastly, Shalvey does a stellar job creating a Morris Day inspired villian.
Please click on pix for artist credits.

I feel like thought balloons are especially important for Moon Knight comics because Marc Spector is actually insane and it is important to understand what is going through his head.

marc spector world’s craziest jew #what is he today? delusional? dissociative? paranoid? #he’s like Batman if all the jokes about Bruce’s mental state were actual canon

I’ve always love thought balloons, though I guess they would get in the way of the ever-popular (and overused) “[Character] is acting like a total jerk, but don’t worry, it’s for a good reason!” thing (since we would be able to see their thoughts and know the real reason they’re being a jerk.

Spoiler: Marc is being a jerk because someone tried to kill him in Egypt and he had some kind of episode and thought an obscure lunar deity resurrected him. Also maybe that actually happened, but he’s still not in a good place, psychologically speaking.

"Before you belch out something incoherent" agelfeygelach:

dr-archeville:

agelfeygelach:

anthonymeloro:

No Time
The above examples show some of the basic differences between Bronze Age and contemporary (mainstream) comic “reading”.  The most obvious characteristic is contemporary comic’s lack of text.  Now before you get all sweaty and belch out something incoherent - yes, I realize this is a singular comparison.  That stated, however, I tend to notice how I’m blazing through recent titles due to the primary focus on action (violence) and less on exposition.  Is one better than the other?  Not the point.  I view this more as a shift to how we consume information: fast and, at times, without complete context.
Ben Marra nicely sums up comic’s current stand on compositions/pacing in relation to refrained use of thought balloons:
A lot of mainstream books don’t use Thought Balloons because they want comic books to be more like movies, where thought balloons can’t exist. They want comic books to be pitches for movie content. Who can blame them when these movies make billions of dollars? The movie executives they’re pitching to don’t like thought balloons I guess. (It’s also the reason why you see a lot of mainstream comics using “widescreen” panels. This makes it easier for movie executives to envision the comic book panels as storyboard or compositions on a screen).
Lastly, Shalvey does a stellar job creating a Morris Day inspired villian.
Please click on pix for artist credits.

I feel like thought balloons are especially important for Moon Knight comics because Marc Spector is actually insane and it is important to understand what is going through his head.

marc spector world’s craziest jew #what is he today? delusional? dissociative? paranoid? #he’s like Batman if all the jokes about Bruce’s mental state were actual canon

I’ve always love thought balloons, though I guess they would get in the way of the ever-popular (and overused) “[Character] is acting like a total jerk, but don’t worry, it’s for a good reason!” thing (since we would be able to see their thoughts and know the real reason they’re being a jerk.

Spoiler: Marc is being a jerk because someone tried to kill him in Egypt and he had some kind of episode and thought an obscure lunar deity resurrected him. Also maybe that actually happened, but he’s still not in a good place, psychologically speaking.

"Before you belch out something incoherent"

agelfeygelach:

dr-archeville:

agelfeygelach:

anthonymeloro:

No Time

The above examples show some of the basic differences between Bronze Age and contemporary (mainstream) comic “reading”.  The most obvious characteristic is contemporary comic’s lack of text.  Now before you get all sweaty and belch out something incoherent - yes, I realize this is a singular comparison.  That stated, however, I tend to notice how I’m blazing through recent titles due to the primary focus on action (violence) and less on exposition.  Is one better than the other?  Not the point.  I view this more as a shift to how we consume information: fast and, at times, without complete context.

Ben Marra nicely sums up comic’s current stand on compositions/pacing in relation to refrained use of thought balloons:

A lot of mainstream books don’t use Thought Balloons because they want comic books to be more like movies, where thought balloons can’t exist. They want comic books to be pitches for movie content. Who can blame them when these movies make billions of dollars? The movie executives they’re pitching to don’t like thought balloons I guess. (It’s also the reason why you see a lot of mainstream comics using “widescreen” panels. This makes it easier for movie executives to envision the comic book panels as storyboard or compositions on a screen).

Lastly, Shalvey does a stellar job creating a Morris Day inspired villian.

Please click on pix for artist credits.

I feel like thought balloons are especially important for Moon Knight comics because Marc Spector is actually insane and it is important to understand what is going through his head.

I’ve always love thought balloons, though I guess they would get in the way of the ever-popular (and overused) “[Character] is acting like a total jerk, but don’t worry, it’s for a good reason!” thing (since we would be able to see their thoughts and know the real reason they’re being a jerk.

Spoiler: Marc is being a jerk because someone tried to kill him in Egypt and he had some kind of episode and thought an obscure lunar deity resurrected him. Also maybe that actually happened, but he’s still not in a good place, psychologically speaking.

"Before you belch out something incoherent"

jeanscomics:

Could this be the cover to Night Burgers #1, a new Negative Pleasure Publication featuring psychedelic day glo comics by Josh Burggraf (joshburggraf), Anthony Meloro (anthonymeloro), Victor Kerlow (thankyouvictor), Josh Freydkis (joshfreydkis), Jason Murphy (menutnutnut), Amy Searles (amyofdarkness) and Ken Johnson (ballandcone)?

Find out soon!

http://negativepleasure.storenvy.com

Uncanny Undergrads #1 - Holy shit and wow.  This was given to me at BCGF ‘11.  Pointing out the blatantly obvious, this is a poorly written, thinly veiled attempt at deriving Marvel’s X-franchise.  I hope that Lousy Book Covers reads my blog. 
So why am I wasting your time with this?  Bob Wulff’s art shows a very stark appreciation for minimalist aesthetics.  Looking at his site, I doubt Wulff is cognizant, or even cares, about that.  But his choices for rendering interior spaces and figures for a superhero comic are so fucking weird that comparisons can be drawn to a lot of contemporary cartoonists - me included.
Undergrads works best at just picking out single or dichotomic panels of expansive white space, scarce, sensitive lines, and blorpy humans.  
The lack of effort behind the story and art is understood simply by looking at the cover.  But then again, for a debut that’s a pretty bold choice by having your protagonist ghostly copping a feel! Ugh, Wulff, are you the next Wiseau?! Uncanny Undergrads #1 - Holy shit and wow.  This was given to me at BCGF ‘11.  Pointing out the blatantly obvious, this is a poorly written, thinly veiled attempt at deriving Marvel’s X-franchise.  I hope that Lousy Book Covers reads my blog. 
So why am I wasting your time with this?  Bob Wulff’s art shows a very stark appreciation for minimalist aesthetics.  Looking at his site, I doubt Wulff is cognizant, or even cares, about that.  But his choices for rendering interior spaces and figures for a superhero comic are so fucking weird that comparisons can be drawn to a lot of contemporary cartoonists - me included.
Undergrads works best at just picking out single or dichotomic panels of expansive white space, scarce, sensitive lines, and blorpy humans.  
The lack of effort behind the story and art is understood simply by looking at the cover.  But then again, for a debut that’s a pretty bold choice by having your protagonist ghostly copping a feel! Ugh, Wulff, are you the next Wiseau?! Uncanny Undergrads #1 - Holy shit and wow.  This was given to me at BCGF ‘11.  Pointing out the blatantly obvious, this is a poorly written, thinly veiled attempt at deriving Marvel’s X-franchise.  I hope that Lousy Book Covers reads my blog. 
So why am I wasting your time with this?  Bob Wulff’s art shows a very stark appreciation for minimalist aesthetics.  Looking at his site, I doubt Wulff is cognizant, or even cares, about that.  But his choices for rendering interior spaces and figures for a superhero comic are so fucking weird that comparisons can be drawn to a lot of contemporary cartoonists - me included.
Undergrads works best at just picking out single or dichotomic panels of expansive white space, scarce, sensitive lines, and blorpy humans.  
The lack of effort behind the story and art is understood simply by looking at the cover.  But then again, for a debut that’s a pretty bold choice by having your protagonist ghostly copping a feel! Ugh, Wulff, are you the next Wiseau?! Uncanny Undergrads #1 - Holy shit and wow.  This was given to me at BCGF ‘11.  Pointing out the blatantly obvious, this is a poorly written, thinly veiled attempt at deriving Marvel’s X-franchise.  I hope that Lousy Book Covers reads my blog. 
So why am I wasting your time with this?  Bob Wulff’s art shows a very stark appreciation for minimalist aesthetics.  Looking at his site, I doubt Wulff is cognizant, or even cares, about that.  But his choices for rendering interior spaces and figures for a superhero comic are so fucking weird that comparisons can be drawn to a lot of contemporary cartoonists - me included.
Undergrads works best at just picking out single or dichotomic panels of expansive white space, scarce, sensitive lines, and blorpy humans.  
The lack of effort behind the story and art is understood simply by looking at the cover.  But then again, for a debut that’s a pretty bold choice by having your protagonist ghostly copping a feel! Ugh, Wulff, are you the next Wiseau?! Uncanny Undergrads #1 - Holy shit and wow.  This was given to me at BCGF ‘11.  Pointing out the blatantly obvious, this is a poorly written, thinly veiled attempt at deriving Marvel’s X-franchise.  I hope that Lousy Book Covers reads my blog. 
So why am I wasting your time with this?  Bob Wulff’s art shows a very stark appreciation for minimalist aesthetics.  Looking at his site, I doubt Wulff is cognizant, or even cares, about that.  But his choices for rendering interior spaces and figures for a superhero comic are so fucking weird that comparisons can be drawn to a lot of contemporary cartoonists - me included.
Undergrads works best at just picking out single or dichotomic panels of expansive white space, scarce, sensitive lines, and blorpy humans.  
The lack of effort behind the story and art is understood simply by looking at the cover.  But then again, for a debut that’s a pretty bold choice by having your protagonist ghostly copping a feel! Ugh, Wulff, are you the next Wiseau?! Uncanny Undergrads #1 - Holy shit and wow.  This was given to me at BCGF ‘11.  Pointing out the blatantly obvious, this is a poorly written, thinly veiled attempt at deriving Marvel’s X-franchise.  I hope that Lousy Book Covers reads my blog. 
So why am I wasting your time with this?  Bob Wulff’s art shows a very stark appreciation for minimalist aesthetics.  Looking at his site, I doubt Wulff is cognizant, or even cares, about that.  But his choices for rendering interior spaces and figures for a superhero comic are so fucking weird that comparisons can be drawn to a lot of contemporary cartoonists - me included.
Undergrads works best at just picking out single or dichotomic panels of expansive white space, scarce, sensitive lines, and blorpy humans.  
The lack of effort behind the story and art is understood simply by looking at the cover.  But then again, for a debut that’s a pretty bold choice by having your protagonist ghostly copping a feel! Ugh, Wulff, are you the next Wiseau?! Uncanny Undergrads #1 - Holy shit and wow.  This was given to me at BCGF ‘11.  Pointing out the blatantly obvious, this is a poorly written, thinly veiled attempt at deriving Marvel’s X-franchise.  I hope that Lousy Book Covers reads my blog. 
So why am I wasting your time with this?  Bob Wulff’s art shows a very stark appreciation for minimalist aesthetics.  Looking at his site, I doubt Wulff is cognizant, or even cares, about that.  But his choices for rendering interior spaces and figures for a superhero comic are so fucking weird that comparisons can be drawn to a lot of contemporary cartoonists - me included.
Undergrads works best at just picking out single or dichotomic panels of expansive white space, scarce, sensitive lines, and blorpy humans.  
The lack of effort behind the story and art is understood simply by looking at the cover.  But then again, for a debut that’s a pretty bold choice by having your protagonist ghostly copping a feel! Ugh, Wulff, are you the next Wiseau?!

Uncanny Undergrads #1 - Holy shit and wow.  This was given to me at BCGF ‘11.  Pointing out the blatantly obvious, this is a poorly written, thinly veiled attempt at deriving Marvel’s X-franchise.  I hope that Lousy Book Covers reads my blog. 

So why am I wasting your time with this?  Bob Wulff’s art shows a very stark appreciation for minimalist aesthetics.  Looking at his site, I doubt Wulff is cognizant, or even cares, about that.  But his choices for rendering interior spaces and figures for a superhero comic are so fucking weird that comparisons can be drawn to a lot of contemporary cartoonists - me included.

Undergrads works best at just picking out single or dichotomic panels of expansive white space, scarce, sensitive lines, and blorpy humans.  

The lack of effort behind the story and art is understood simply by looking at the cover.  But then again, for a debut that’s a pretty bold choice by having your protagonist ghostly copping a feel! Ugh, Wulff, are you the next Wiseau?!

jeanscomics:

Could this be the cover to Night Burgers #1, a new Negative Pleasure Publication featuring psychedelic day glo comics by Josh Burggraf (joshburggraf), Anthony Meloro (anthonymeloro), Victor Kerlow (thankyouvictor), Josh Freydkis (joshfreydkis), Jason Murphy (menutnutnut), Amy Searles (amyofdarkness) and Ken Johnson (ballandcone)?

Find out soon!

http://negativepleasure.storenvy.com

Remember my friend that was traveling the world for almost 2.5 years because he can and we can’t?  Sure you don’t.
When visiting Japan he was nice enough to pick me up this fun Godzilla/Pacific Rim/Eva parody.  Nice thick linework always makes me smile.
The back-up story of Two Thousand Sunglasses is a thoughtfully rendered humor piece that echoes a “PG” Karissa Sakumoto.
Can anyone translate the above? Remember my friend that was traveling the world for almost 2.5 years because he can and we can’t?  Sure you don’t.
When visiting Japan he was nice enough to pick me up this fun Godzilla/Pacific Rim/Eva parody.  Nice thick linework always makes me smile.
The back-up story of Two Thousand Sunglasses is a thoughtfully rendered humor piece that echoes a “PG” Karissa Sakumoto.
Can anyone translate the above? Remember my friend that was traveling the world for almost 2.5 years because he can and we can’t?  Sure you don’t.
When visiting Japan he was nice enough to pick me up this fun Godzilla/Pacific Rim/Eva parody.  Nice thick linework always makes me smile.
The back-up story of Two Thousand Sunglasses is a thoughtfully rendered humor piece that echoes a “PG” Karissa Sakumoto.
Can anyone translate the above? Remember my friend that was traveling the world for almost 2.5 years because he can and we can’t?  Sure you don’t.
When visiting Japan he was nice enough to pick me up this fun Godzilla/Pacific Rim/Eva parody.  Nice thick linework always makes me smile.
The back-up story of Two Thousand Sunglasses is a thoughtfully rendered humor piece that echoes a “PG” Karissa Sakumoto.
Can anyone translate the above? Remember my friend that was traveling the world for almost 2.5 years because he can and we can’t?  Sure you don’t.
When visiting Japan he was nice enough to pick me up this fun Godzilla/Pacific Rim/Eva parody.  Nice thick linework always makes me smile.
The back-up story of Two Thousand Sunglasses is a thoughtfully rendered humor piece that echoes a “PG” Karissa Sakumoto.
Can anyone translate the above?

Remember my friend that was traveling the world for almost 2.5 years because he can and we can’t?  Sure you don’t.

When visiting Japan he was nice enough to pick me up this fun Godzilla/Pacific Rim/Eva parody.  Nice thick linework always makes me smile.

The back-up story of Two Thousand Sunglasses is a thoughtfully rendered humor piece that echoes a “PG” Karissa Sakumoto.

Can anyone translate the above?

jeanscomics:

Josh Freydkis ( joshfreydkis), from Revulsion Comics #1.  Revulsion is an anthology of horror comics featuring work by Josh, Laurie Pina, Anthony Meloro, Garrett Young and GW Duncanson ( aka cobijitas, anthonymeloro, doctopmaru, cash-money-cartoons), edited by Harris Smith and published by Negative Pleasure Publications.

Get Revulsion now: http://negativepleasure.storenvy.com

look for josh freydkis and anthony meloro in night burgers #1 and jeans #3 and laurie pina in jeans #3.

Look out for us